Marine Science in the News: Engineers create programmable morphing skin

One of the most impressive masters of camouflage is the octopus. In the blink of an eye, these skillful cephalopods can change color and texture to blend in with their surroundings or to startle or warn potential predators. Octopus ability to morph their skin has inspired engineers at Cornell University to develop a synthetic “camouflaging skin” that has a range of potential applications. The team of engineers collaborated with expert cephalopod biologist Roger Hanlon of the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) in Woods Hole, MA. They investigated octopus muscular morphology for controlling their dynamic camouflage, modeled the design, and developed 2D synthetic tissue that can be programmed a

Marine Science in the News: Engineers create programmable morphing skin

One of the most impressive masters of camouflage is the octopus. In the blink of an eye, these skillful cephalopods can change color and texture to blend in with their surroundings or to startle or warn potential predators. Octopus ability to morph their skin has inspired engineers at Cornell University to develop a synthetic “camouflaging skin” that has a range of potential applications. The team of engineers collaborated with expert cephalopod biologist Roger Hanlon of the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) in Woods Hole, MA. They investigated octopus muscular morphology for controlling their dynamic camouflage, modeled the design, and developed 2D synthetic tissue that can be programmed a

Marine Science in the News: Hitch hiking coral and hermit crab symbionts

A recently discovered species of shell-less hermit crab was found living in a walking coral’s cavity, replacing the usual marine worm symbiont! This new hermit crab species was recently discovered in shallow waters of southern Japan. Instead of a shell on its back the crab was found living in corallums (living skeletons) of solitary walking corals. These corals usually have species of marine worm living inside of them, but the new hermit crab (Diogenes heteropsammicola) replaced the usual worm symbiont. D. heteropsammicola is the only known hermit crab to partner with a living coral. The hermit crab and the coral have a mutually beneficial relationship: the hermit crab prevents the coral fro

Marine Science in the News: Hitch hiking coral and hermit crab symbionts

A recently discovered species of shell-less hermit crab was found living in a walking coral’s cavity, replacing the usual marine worm symbiont! This new hermit crab species was recently discovered in shallow waters of southern Japan. Instead of a shell on its back the crab was found living in corallums (living skeletons) of solitary walking corals. These corals usually have species of marine worm living inside of them, but the new hermit crab (Diogenes heteropsammicola) replaced the usual worm symbiont. D. heteropsammicola is the only known hermit crab to partner with a living coral. The hermit crab and the coral have a mutually beneficial relationship: the hermit crab prevents the coral fro

Marine Science in the News: Success for West Coast rockfish

Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) help conserve marine natural and cultural resources. They also facilitate recovery of diminished animal populations by protecting reproductive adults. A recent study published in Royal Society Open Science shows that the protection of a commonly eaten rockfish species in MPAs off the coast of Southern California may be helping the population outside of the protected area as well. West Coast rockfish species were in deep collapse during the 1990s due to excessive fishing. There are at least 68 species of rockfish along the West Coast of the U.S., most of which are commonly eaten. They are a long-lived species, with some living until they are 50 years old and othe

Marine Science in the News: Success for West Coast rockfish

Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) help conserve marine natural and cultural resources. They also facilitate recovery of diminished animal populations by protecting reproductive adults. A recent study published in Royal Society Open Science shows that the protection of a commonly eaten rockfish species in MPAs off the coast of Southern California may be helping the population outside of the protected area as well. West Coast rockfish species were in deep collapse during the 1990s due to excessive fishing. There are at least 68 species of rockfish along the West Coast of the U.S., most of which are commonly eaten. They are a long-lived species, with some living until they are 50 years old and othe

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